Some Words to Encourage

Written by Scott Harp on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

depressionDeath has such a hold on the hearts of individuals, especially those who are closest to it. It shocks the mind. Being that it is so severe, so final, and so life changing for those left behind, the loss of a loved one is going to take its toll on those closest to them. Get help! Having someone to talk with helps to endure the effect of the transition that has sharply blind-sided one's life.
The tendency often is that of refusing the help being offered. Some take the "matter-of-fact" approach, seeking to compartmentalize the hurt, and move on with life. However, not dealing with pain and suffering when it comes—and oh brother, does it come—will cause a residual effect over the years of one's life. This we sometimes refer to as baggage.

One Family's Search

Written by Scott Harp on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

familyCraig and Tara Jones were the typical American couple. They grew up in middle class families, met in college, and were married in their junior year. Neither of the two came from families who were, what one would call, churchgoers. Both had gone to the occasional holiday worship service with friends from school, and maybe a Vacation Bible School here and there. But, church was just not a big thing to them. Both were professional people, yet after a few years of marriage, they began a family, having a boy, and then a couple years later, a little girl. As the children grew to an age where they communicated pretty well, their parents began hearing how they picked up little words, very "adult" words, and would say them. At first it was a mixture between cute, and a little shocking, hearing such little ones saying words that they remembered their parents not letting them say. Before long they found themselves telling the little ones not to say words like that.

Who was Cain's wife?

Written by Scott Harp on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

familysilhouettebeachblueHave you ever “googled” the words, “Who was Cain’s wife?” There are literally hundreds of sites online debating in one form or other the authenticity and impact of the Biblical account of Cain’s family. In most cases, any discussion on the wife of Cain, as reported in Genesis 4:17, is questioned in order to discredit not only the historical marriage, but more importantly, God, who gave us the record of her life. Without doubt, people will go to great lengths rejecting the Bible to “excuse” their duty to obey it. So, who was Cain’s wife? There is much one can know about a person by their choices of companions. The apostle wrote, “Do not be deceived: Bad company ruins good morals,’” 1 Corinthians 15:33. As true as those words are today, the same can be said concerning folks who lived back at the beginning as well. As with all Bible characters, we know more about the event surrounding her life, than about her as a person. Though her name is not mentioned, to say we know very little about her is far from the truth. Here are some things we know about Cain’s wife.

Marriage through the eyes of Marshall Keeble

Written by Scott Harp on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

keeble12In our library is a book Willie Cato wrote entitled, His Hand And Heart: The Wit And Wisdom Of Marshall Keeble. In it Brother Cato, a great gospel preacher and a dearly departed family friend, reflected on his years of travel with Brother Keeble, and the interesting perspective he had on the Christian life. Concerning marriage Keeble encouraged young men to prepare themselves in view of being a good prospect for a young lady to marry. He said, “You’re looking for the best girl to marry, but what is she looking for? If you live a hog’s life—down in the mire all the time—what angel would want to lay down with hogs?” Brother Keeble had a witty way of making his points. As for the right person to marry he said, “Don’t marry one who is not a member of the church of Christ. You’ll have trouble! Just don’t marry—you’ll have enough trouble with them that are members of the church of Christ.” Marriage is not always easy. It takes work on the part of both people involved.