Meditation

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

meditation bcocScripture indicates that our thoughts should be directed toward God. For example, we are instructed to “set [our] minds[s] on things that are above, not on things that are on earth” (Colossians 3:2)  One way in which we train ourselves to to direct our thoughts toward God is through the practice of biblical meditation, that is, reflecting on the character, nature, and commands of God through His word. The expectation of meditating on God’s word is evident in Deuteronomy 11:18 when God instructed His people to “lay up these words of mine in your heart” as well as in Psalm 1:1-2 when the author of this psalm pronounced a blessing on the individual who “meditates" on God’s law "day and night.” With such an emphasis on meditation it seems only fitting that we consider how this practice can be employed today; therefore, this week’s spiritual exercise is designed to challenge us to engage in biblical meditation either by meditating on God’s word or God’s works.

.PDF Version - click here

The Discipline of Meditation

Prayer

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

prayer bcocPrayer is essential. In Scripture we are instructed to "be constant in prayer” (Romans 12:12), to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17), and to “continue steadfastly in prayer” (Colossians 4:22). Prayer is intended to eliminate our anxiety (Philippians 4:6), to protect us against the schemes of the devil (Ephesians 6:18), and to align our will with God’s (Matthew 6:10). With so much emphasis placed on prayer in Scripture we should constantly be looking to improve our prayer life. This week’s spiritual exercise is designed to equip us with biblically-based prayer strategies that we may have overlooked in the past.

For a .pdf version - click hereThe Discipline of Prayer

FASTING

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

bcoc fastingIn Matthew 6 Jesus gave instructions regarding “when you give to the needy…” (Matthew 6:2), “when you pray…” (Matthew 6:5), and “when you fast…” (Matthew 6:16). He did not use the word “if” but “when” as if to indicate that He assumed His disciples would practice these exercises of faith. Generally speaking, we hold ourselves accountable to the expectation of giving and praying but not fasting. Yet, fasting was practiced by Jesus (Matthew 4:1-2) and the early church (Acts 13:2-3; 14:23). Thus, there must be a context in which it can be beneficial for our spiritual growth today. So, this week’s spiritual exercise is designed to educate and engage us in the discipline of fasting.

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Fasting

Time Assessment Worksheet

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

selfevaluateIn Ephesians 5:15-17, Paul instructs us to "Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise, making the best use of the time.” Spiritual training requires us to be wise stewards of our time. So, one spiritual exercise in which we should engage is a time assessment. Utilize the attached exercise to determine whether or not you are wisely utilizing your time for your spiritual growth.

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Time Assessment Worksheet