DEVOTED TO THE LORD'S SUPPER

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

BreakingBreadBCOCIn Acts 2:42-47 we are given a glimpse into the life of the first century church, and this section begins with the simple phrase “they devoted themselves to.” And as the church’s story unfolds throughout the book of Acts it becomes apparent that their measurement of growth was not based on numbers but on one’s level of devotion to God. So, in this series of articles, we are exploring what the first century church devoted itself to so that we can determine whether or not we are devoting ourselves to the same things. According to Acts 2:42, the first century church “devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayers.” We have already explored their devotion to God’s Word (i.e. “the apostles teaching) and fellowship so now we turn our attention to “the breaking of bread.”

DEVOTED TO THE FELLOWSHIP

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

FellowshipIn Acts 2:42-47 we are given a glimpse into the life of the first century church, and this section begins with the simple phrase “they devoted themselves to.” In the following verses we discover that they possessed devotion to God’s Word, fellowship, the Lord’s Supper, and prayer, as well as an emphasis on giving, involvement, worship, and evangelism. And as the church’s story unfolds throughout the book of Acts it becomes apparent that their measurement of growth was not based on numbers but on one’s level of devotion to God. So, in this series of articles, we are exploring what the first century church devoted itself to so we can determine whether or not we are devoting ourselves to the same things. According to Acts 2:42, the first century church not only devoted itself to God’s word (i.e. Apostles’ teaching) but it also devoted itself to fellowship.

DEVOTED TO THE WORD

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Minister Articles

devotedtoword bcocChurches can easily become consumed with numbers. We track the number of people who attend our weekly services. We track the amount of money placed in the collection plate. We track the number of individuals who are converted as a result of our evangelistic efforts. Numbers matter to us because they provide a simple way to measure growth. But are numbers the best way to measure growth?

WHY DOES GOD ALLOW EVIL TO EXIST? (PART 2)

Written by Kyle Rye on . Posted in Pulpit Minster

good evil bcocIn last week’s article entitled Why Does God Allow Evil to Exist? (Part 1) we contended that reconciling the existence of God and the presence of evil is like driving a car down a curvy mountain road on a foggy night. In order to arrive at your destination, you have to stay between the known boundaries (i.e. yellow and white lines). The same principle applies to our investigation of the relationship between a good God and an evil world. As long as we stay between the boundaries of what we know about God and what we know about this world, then we can arrive at a destination that makes at least partial sense out of the presence of evil and suffering.